This page lists a selection of photo hardware, that is suited best for shooting HDRIs and panoramic images. I do not claim this list would be anywhere near complete, and the recommendations purely reflect my own opinion. The ratings, however, are done by users - and everyone is invited to put in a vote.

Click on the Icon to jump to an offsite review, that I found most helpful.

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Digital Cameras


If shooting HDRI is your excuse for getting a better DSLR, look for Auto Exposure Bracketing (AEB). The models listed here excel in this feature.

Canon EOS 1D Mark III

Allows configuration of a personal bracketing mode, with up to 7 frames in 3 EV steps. Burst mode up to 10 fps, which means you can shoot handheld HDRIs in almost every situation.
10 MP | 1.3 crop factor | $4.200 (Body Only) on Amazon.com

Nikon D3

Nikon's new flagship camera. Miraculously captures noiseless images at high ISO, which means you can shoot handheld with fast shutter everywhere. Sports AEB with 9 frames in 1 EV steps, with 9 fps.
12.1 MP | Fullframe | $5.300 (Body Only) on Amazon.com

Nikon D300

Evolutionary upgrade to the D200. Or better put, it's a smaller D3 with a smaller sensor for a smaller budget. Shoots the same 9 frame AEB in 1 EV steps, with 6fps (8 with a battery grip).
12.3 MP | 1.5 crop factor | $1.750 (Body Only) on Amazon.com

Pentax K20D

Big Bracketing on a budget! Shoots 5 frames in 2 EV steps, which is really all you need (and the same end-to-end coverage you get from the Nikons). But has only 3 fps, so don't go without your tripod.
14.6 MP | 1.5 crop factor | $1.300 (Body Only) on Amazon.com

Fisheye Lenses


Sure, you can shoot a pano with any lens. But fisheyes allow you to capture more FOV in one shot, thus getting your panorama done with fewer shots.

Nikon 10.5mm f/2.8

First-class quality lens, best you can get for a Nikon. Gets you 180° diagonal FOV, so there is no circular border visible. Takes you 6+2 shots to cover a full panorama. I use it all the time and love it.

Sigma 8mm f/3.5

A panorama shooter's classic. Great metal housing, moderate image quality. Pictures a cropped circle on small sensor cams, and full circular 180° on a fullframe sensors.

Sigma 4.5mm f/2.8

This one is a little revolution. It is your only choice for getting a fully circular 180° FOV image on anything other than a fullframe sensor camera. Lets you make a panorama with as little as 2-3 shots.

Panorama Heads


It takes a special tripod head to turn the camera around the optical pivot of your lens (AKA nodal point), so your images are free from parallax shift.

Manfrotto 303 SPH

Heavy-duty all-purpose head, that can secure the biggest cameras. Solid metal engineering, weights 2 kg on it's own, pretty bulky to carry around. Has lots of sharp corners, bumping into it hurts.

Nodal Ninja 3

Simple and small, fits in every backpack and available with a padded pouch. Yet solid enough to hold my Nikon D200. Shot 90% of my panos with this head, and I'm entirely satisfied.

360 Precision Absolute

This head is built for a specific camera/lens configuration. As long as you don't change your gear this head is always perfectly calibrated, so you can stitch from a template. Great for power shooters.

Really Right Stuff

Hailed by professionals as the pristine solution. A modular system, where each component is designed for flexible use. Super-sturdy, even with big cameras. Biggest con: The rotator has no click-stops.

Miscellaneous

Two-axis bubble level

A bubble level that slides on the flash shoe, allowing you to check the leveling of your camera (instead of just your tripod). Tiny, but useful accessory.